Will Styler's Homepage

Will Styler

Post-Doctoral Research Fellow - University of Michigan Linguistics

Teaching

Teaching brings me a great deal of joy, and I'm passionate about sharing the joy of language with students, novice and experienced. Although I've primarily taught in Linguistics and Phonetics, I've also found lots of fun little niches in which I can guest lecture and teach other things, on campus and elsewhere, and any time I can come up with an entertaining analogy for something somebody's having trouble understanding, I'm a happy man.

Although I'm currently on a research appointment, I do hope to return to the classroom soon! Here are some of my past teaching experiences.

Past Teaching Highlights

For a detailed description of all courses, workshops and classes that I’ve taught in the past, please see my CV. Faculty Evaluations for all formal courses are available upon request.

Lead Graduate Teacher, CU Department of Linguistics - Academic Years 2012-2014

Alongside a full-time research position (split between Phonetics and Computational Linguistics), I was asked to fill the role of Lead Graduate Teacher (and then repeat it!) for the CU Linguistics Department for the 2012-2013 and 2013-2014 Academic Years through the CU Graduate Teacher Program. My task was to help train incoming and returning graduate teachers and TAs, to consult with students having teaching-related difficulties, to conduct Video Teaching consultations, and to help connect graduate teachers with the resources they need to do the best job they can in the classroom.

Instructor, Using Praat for Linguistic Research Workshop at the 2011 LSA institute - Summer 2011

This workshop was a 4 hour intensive seminar about using the Praat Phonetics Software package for linguistic measurement, sound modification, and Praat scripting, using my online text, Using Praat for Linguistic Research. The workshop was repeated twice during the institute (due to high demand), and once again in the Fall of 2011 for CU Students and Faculty who missed it during the institute.

Recipient, 2013 University of Colorado at Boulder 'Graduate Teaching Excellence Award'

In Spring of 2013, based on student evaluations, recommendations, and observation in the classroom, I was awarded the campus-wide Graduate Teaching Excellence Award, designed to "recognize the teaching abilities, skills, and practices of the University's most outstanding graduate student [instructors of record]". My acceptance speech was posted on YouTube, for some reason.

Graduate Instructor, LING 5030 - Linguistic Phonetics - Fall 2011, University of Colorado

LING 5030 is one of the first classes that new MA-level students take, and it serves as an introduction to phonetics for all new students. Focusing strongly on the laboratory and acoustical aspects of speech (although with an articulatory background), the two weekly lectures and weekly lab session aimed to teach graduate students not only the basics of phonetics, but to ensure that all of them were capable of performing basic phonetic data collection and experimentation as well.

Graduate Instructor, LING 3100 - Language Sound Structures - Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012

LING 3100 is an undergraduate introduction to phonetics and phonology, focusing on sharing the joy of vowels, the pain of the English writing system, and the utility of acoustic and phonological analysis to all fields which deal with language. It's a semester-long course at CU, 2 lectures and a lab each week, which is required for both Linguistics and Speech, Language and Hearing Science majors.

Graduate Instructor, LING 1020 - Languages of the World - Fall 2014

LING 1020 is an introductory course in linguistics, dealing with the ideas of typology, linguistic diversity, language description, and the incredible differences between languages which make Language such a wonderful topic to study. The goal of the course is to train new potential linguists to think about language in a broader sense, to teach the basic ideas of linguistic diversity, and most importantly, to show new college students why Language is incredible and merits their attention and study.

Coordinator and Instructor, CU Linguistics Department Teaching Intensive - Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013

I created, planned, and implemented a half-day training for incoming teachers in the CU Linguistics department. This training included a microteaching session, discussion of teaching, grading, managing classroom chaos, and resources available to students. It was repeated as a 2 hour workshop (without Microteaching) in the Spring for a small group of new instructors.

Invited Presenter, Expect the Unexpected workshop for the Graduate Teacher Program - Spring, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

From sobbing students to medical mishaps, intolerant outbursts to unsettling essays, a good teacher needs to be prepared to take on the unexpected, both in and out of the classroom. This interactive workshop focuses on developing strategies for managing classroom chaos and shock-proofing teaching so that when crisis calls, one can confidently answer. Presented for the GTP's Spring Workshop series in 2013, as well as two Fall GTP Intensives, and open to teachers all over the campus.

Invited Presenter, Writing Readably and Reading Writably workshop for the Graduate Teacher Program - Spring 2014

A workshop on effective academic research, aimed at newly-minted graduate students still developing a personal writing style. The focus of the discussion was on writing accessibly, clearly, and in such a way that the reader understands that you do not hate them with the fire of 1000 burning suns. The slides are available online, and the lecture is available on YouTube.

Invited Presenter, Putting the LOL in Classroom Learning: Humor in the Classroom workshop for the Graduate Teacher Program - Spring 2014

A workshop on using humor in a college classroom, focused on the benefits and methods of including humor, but also discussing the potential pitfalls of the use of humor, and where to draw the line. The slides are available online.

Teaching Assistant, LING 3100 - Language Sound Structures - Spring 2013

LING 3100 is an undergraduate introduction to phonetics and phonology, focusing on sharing the joy of vowels, the pain of the English writing system, and the utility of acoustic and phonological analysis to all fields which deal with language. It's a semester-long course at CU, 2 lectures and a lab each week, which is required for both Linguistics and Speech, Language and Hearing Science majors. As TA, I provided support to a new instructor, as well as grading all assignments and running the lab sessions.

CU Stampede First-year Leadership Camp - 2007-2012, University of Colorado

I've been involved with the CU Stampede First Year Leadership Camp, an intensive orientation/conference for 50 incoming Freshmen interested in campus involvement during a small training camp at the start of Fall Semester since 2007. In 2007, I was co-coordinator, arranging, lecturing, and coordinating the event, and in the years since, I've been asked to return as a mentor for a small group of incoming students. In addition, each year, I've presented a program called "Your writing system is lying to you", an exploration of the truth behind the English sound system and the crazy things that our writing system does to deceive us, aimed to pique student interest in language and phonetics.